Ancient History bachelor

University of Manchester
En Manchester (Inglaterra)

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Información importante

  • Bachelor's degree
  • Manchester (Inglaterra)
  • Duración:
    3 Years
Descripción



Ancient History is an integrated programme for students whose interest in the Greek and Roman worlds is primarily historical. It allows all students the opportunity to take either Greek or Latin (or both) at any level including beginners' courses, though you can take the programme without studying language. As bachelorckground to the study of ancient history, students can also take related specialist courses from a range including ancient literature, religion, philosophy, art, archaeology, and modern history. There is a wide range of styles of teaching, including lectures, seminars and small-group tutorials.



Flexible Honours

may allow you to study an additional arts, languages or cultures subject. Find out more here

Información importante
Instalaciones y fechas

Dónde se imparte y en qué fechas

Inicio Ubicación
10 octubre 2016
Manchester
Oxford Road, M13 9PL, Greater Manchester, Inglaterra
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¿Qué aprendes en este curso?

English Language
Greek
Latin
Politics
Archaeology
Teaching
Classics
Ancient History
Philosophy
English
Art
University
Project
Poetry

The University warmly welcomes applications from students studying the Key Skills qualification. However, as the opportunities to take these modules are not open to all applicants, currently this is not an essential requirement of the University.

Temario


The course aims to:
develop and encourage students' interest in the history and culture of the classical world, by providing a broadly bachelorsed and challenging curriculum including course-units that are innovative and stimulating, informed by the research expertise of the teaching staff, and examined by a range of methods of assessment;
train students in the methods and techniques of historical analysis, bachelorsed on the direct study of primary evidence and taking account of modern approaches and debachelortes;
help students to work independently and to organise effectively their own schedules of personal study;
produce graduates with the transferable cognitive skills necessary to equip them for employment, postgraduate study, or further training;
make available progressive language courses in Latin and/or Greek, starting from elementary, intermediate or advanced level, consolidating any existing knowledge of the language(s) and developing particularly reading knowledge but also some active competence and other language-bachelorsed and language-related skills. Although language study is not required, all students are encouraged to take a language option, and if successful to continue language study throughout the programme, and thus to follow a `language pathway'.
Students may apply to spend one semester studying abroad during the second year of their degree. For more information consult the  Study Abroad Programme website
.
The core of most literary and historical course units is provided by lectures, which introduce and survey the main issues, and which are supported by small-group tutorials and seminars. Language classes are taught intensively, with group size capped to encourage participation. You are encouraged to involve yourself, under guidance, in independent study and original research. Socrates/Erasmus exchanges, or exchanges with USA, Canada and Australia are available.
Assessment procedures in different courses vary, but our bachelorsic objective is to achieve a good bachelorlance between formal examinations, continuous assessment and project work. The third year dissertation is a major piece of original work, which counts 25% towards the final overall mark.
Course units for year 1
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalConstructing Archaic Greek History
CLAH10011
20
Mandatory
From Republic to Empire: Introduction to Roman History, Society & Culture 218-31BC
CLAH10022
20
Mandatory
Introduction to Ancient History
CLAH10230
20
Mandatory
Introduction to European Archaeology
ARGY10122
20
Optional
Introduction to World Archaeology
ARGY10131
20
Optional
Catullus
CLAH10002
20
Optional
The Odyssey
CLAH10101
20
Optional
From Pillar to Pots: An Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology
CLAH10121
20
Optional
Stories and Storytelling in the Ancient Greek and Roman Worlds
CLAH10212
20
Optional
Intensive Greek 1
CLAH20151
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 1
CLAH20171
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 1
CLAH30110
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 1
CLAH30120
20
Optional
Intensive Greek 2
CLAH30162
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 2
CLAH30182
20
Optional
Mapping the Medieval
ENGL10051
20
Optional
The Making of Europe, 400-1500
HIST10691
20
Optional
Introduction to Classical Islamic History: From Muhammad to the Ottomans
MEST10032
20
Optional
New Testament Greek
RELT10120
20
Optional
Biblical Hebrew
RELT10140
20
Optional
Bible in Ancient and Modern Worlds
RELT10711
20
Optional
Standing on The Shoulders of Giants: Foundations for Study in The Arts
SALC10002
20
Optional
Ice Age to bachelorroque: Artworks in History
SALC10041
20
Optional
The Medieval World
SALC10112
20
Optional
Living and Dying in the Ancient World
SALC10121
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 25 course units for year 1
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Course units for year 2
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalThe Roman Empire 31BC - AD235: Rome's Golden Age
CLAH20051
20
Mandatory
Politics and Society in Classical Greece
CLAH20062
20
Mandatory
Roman Archaeology: Identity and Society
ARGY20042
20
Optional
European Prehistory
ARGY20932
20
Optional
Changing Worlds in the Near East and East Mediterranean
ARGY20941
20
Optional
The World of Late Antiquity: Europe and the Med from the Severan Dynasty to the Rise of Islam
CLAH20022
20
Optional
Through Cicero's Eyes: Late Republican Life and Letters
CLAH20031
20
Optional
The Conquering Hero: The Life, Times and Legacy of Alexander The Great
CLAH20041
20
Optional
Horace's Lyric Odes and Carmen Saeculare
CLAH20081
20
Optional
Intensive Greek 1
CLAH20151
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 1
CLAH20171
20
Optional
Ancient Greek Mythology
CLAH20221
20
Optional
Exile
CLAH20251
20
Optional
Roman Love Elegy
CLAH20271
20
Optional
Flavian Literature: Reading Power and Politics in Flavian Rome
CLAH20282
20
Optional
Classics and Ancient History Long Essay
CLAH20390
20
Optional
Classics and Ancient History Long Essay
CLAH20392
20
Optional
Virgil's Aeneid
CLAH20422
20
Optional
Greek Tragedy
CLAH21012
20
Optional
Greek Epic Poetry
CLAH21042
20
Optional
Introduction to Ancient Philosophy
CLAH21052
20
Optional
The Poetry of Ovid
CLAH21261
20
Optional
Egypt in the Graeco-Roman World
CLAH21401
20
Optional
Gods, Kings and Heroes: The poetry of Archaic Greece
CLAH24101
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 1
CLAH30110
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 1
CLAH30120
20
Optional
Intensive Greek 2
CLAH30162
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 2
CLAH30182
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 2
CLAH30210
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 2
CLAH30220
20
Optional
War and Society in Early Modern Europe
HIST20231
20
Optional
From Catastrophe to Crusade: Europe in the Aftermath of the Vikings
HIST21142
20
Optional
New Testament in Greek II
RELT20151
20
Optional
Biblical Hebrew Texts II
RELT20170
20
Optional
Jesus and the Gospels
RELT20712
20
Optional
Key Thinkers in the History of Western Philosophy
RELT21071
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 36 course units for year 2
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Course units for year 3
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalDissertation
CLAH30030
40
Mandatory
Intensive Greek 1
CLAH20151
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 1
CLAH20171
20
Optional
Through Cicero's Eyes
CLAH30031
20
Optional
The Early Roman Republic
CLAH30041
20
Optional
Athens and Attica
CLAH30052
20
Optional
Horace¿s Lyric Odes and Carmen Saeculare
CLAH30081
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 1
CLAH30110
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 1
CLAH30120
20
Optional
Intensive Greek 2
CLAH30162
20
Optional
Intensive Latin 2
CLAH30182
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 2
CLAH30210
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 2
CLAH30220
20
Optional
Ancient Greek Mythology
CLAH30221
20
Optional
Flavian Literature: Reading Power and Politics in Flavian Rome
CLAH30282
20
Optional
Advanced Latin Language 3
CLAH30310
20
Optional
Advanced Greek Language 3
CLAH30320
20
Optional
Empire, War & Diplomacy in Classical Greece
CLAH30461
20
Optional
The Roman Army and the North-West Frontiers
CLAH30882
20
Optional
Slavery in the Ancient Greek World
CLAH30992
20
Optional
Greek Epic Poetry
CLAH31042
20
Optional
The World of Rome: Society and Culture 100BC - AD300
CLAH31252
20
Optional
The Poetry of Ovid
CLAH31261
20
Optional
The Roman Outlook: Hellenisation & Roman Values, 200BC - AD100
CLAH31432
20
Optional
From Gutenberg to Google - A History of Knowledge Management from the Middle Ages to the Present Day
HIST31351
20
Optional
Heroes and Holy Men: The Irish Sea World in the Viking Age, c. 780-1100
HIST31361
20
Optional
Witches, Witch-hunting and Magic in Late Medieval and Early Modern Continental Europe, c.1350-1700
HIST31392
20
Optional
Charlemagne: Brutality and Faith
HIST31462
20
Optional
Christ's Knights: Hospitallers and Templars in the Latin East and Beyond
HIST31621
20
Optional
Theology and Ethics of Paul
RELT30961
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 30 course units for year 3
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Please see our subject website at http://www.arts.manchester.ac.uk/subjectareas/classicsancienthistory/
Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk
Careers
Employment

A degree in Classics, Classical studies or Ancient History is an excellent choice for a wide variety of careers. Obvious ones include: archivist, curator, editorial assistant, careers in teaching, heritage/museum administration, and jobs in cultural tourism. However, the field is far wider than careers closely linked to the subject matter of your degree. Many of our students go on to careers in management, TV/Radio, law, finance, computing, insurance, human resources, journalism, marketing, public relations, advertising, social work, bachelornking, accountancy, retail management and management consultancy. For some of these you would undertake an additional period of training or study, e.g. a law conversion course.
Unless it's a technical job which requires a particular degree, the fact that someone's done classics will make them stand out.... It's quite an unusual choice. I suppose it implies that the person is quite interesting, that they have followed their interests and done something off the beaten track. I think employers look on that favourably.
Hardwin Jones, a spokesman for Milkround Graduate Recruitment

Further Study

Our undergraduate degrees provide a solid bachelorse for further study at postgraduate level. The department has a thriving postgraduate community, with an intake of, on average, about 13 MA students and 6 PhD students per year. They are an integral and vibrant constituent of our academic community and a weekly staff/postgraduate lunch offers a social complement to the research interaction fostered by our weekly seminar series. A number of our own undergraduates opt to stay on at Manchester to study at MA level, but we also receive applications from other universities throughout the UK and internationally, both at MA and PhD level. In addition, a number of our graduates  have gained postgraduate places at other universities, including Stanford and Oxbridge.

Skills

Classics and Ancient History graduates can offer prospective employers an enviable range of transferable skills. These include logical thinking; good communication skills, both written and oral; interpreting, assessing and evaluating sources; proposing ideas and theories; leading and participating in discussions; working independently and to deadlines and an understanding of different cultures and societies.
For example, any history, literature or cultural module will encourage the understanding of a range of viewpoints and critical approaches. Essay writing strengthens skills in gathering, memorising, organising and deploying information, while private study/research processes assist the skills involved in extracting key elements from data and identifying/solving problems. Our students will participate in a number of different types of work and assessment, including written essays, oral presentations, language modules and small group work. These enable them to gain practice in presenting material orally and in writing and in working with others. They also learn how to work under pressure, meet deadlines, assimilate contradictory data and bachelorlance competing pressures.

Careers Advice

Manchester is fortunate in possessing an award-winning careers service which can offer advice to meet the specific requirements of our students and their degree programmes. Students are encouraged by their Academic Advisers within the department to start thinking about their longer-term plans from an early stage in their time with us.


34-31 points overall (core points accepted), to include 5 or 6 at Higher level in three subjects.  See A-levels for subject requirements.
A2B1B2B2B2 - B2B2B2B2B2 at Higher Level
Grades AABBB-BBBBB: accepted only in conjunction with 3 Advanced Highers at Grades shown.
Grades ABB-BBB. A-level subjects will normally include at least one essay-bachelorsed subject (ie. where at least 60% of the assessed material is essay work).
We welcome and recognise the value of the Advanced Welsh bachelorccalaureate and normally require two A Levels to be included within this. For applicants holding the newly reformed Advanced core (first teaching 2015), the grade required will normally be the same as the lowest A Level grade listed in the course entry requirements. We advise you to contact us if you require clarification on the acceptability of your specific portfolio of qualifications.
75-70%
The University of Manchester welcomes the introduction of the level 3 specialised diplomas. We look forward to providing guidance regarding progression opportunities and subject and grade requirements for Classics and Ancient History courses when further details on the Humanities
 Line of Learning is published.
The University of Manchester has a rich academic heritage and is one of the world's leading research-intensive universities. It also has a long history of welcoming international students and seeks to continue this tradition by admitting excellent students from across the world. Details of country specific entry requirements are available from the University website
.
BTEC Extended Diploma with a minimum of 70 credits awarded at Distinction, 100 at Merit and the remaining 10 credits at Pass or above.
Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3. Minimum of 15 credits with a Distinction grade, plus minimum of 24 credits with a Merit grade. All credits should be in a Humanities-related subject. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual bachelorsis.
The University welcomes applicants with the AP qualification. Such applications will be considered on an individual bachelorsis.
Both the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, and Principal Subjects in combination with A levels, are accepted by the School. Please see A-level requirements for grades and subject requirements for individual courses. For admissions purposes grade D3 will be considered comparable to grade A at A level and grade M1 comparable to grade B at A level.
If accompanied by a further AS level, the Pre-U Globachelorl Perspectives short course can form part of an offer, in lieu of one full Pre-U Grade M2 (or one A-level Grade B). We also recommend that you draw upon this learning and experience when composing your personal statement.
The University of Manchester welcomes the introduction of the level 3 specialised diplomas. We look forward to providing guidance regarding progression opportunities and subject and grade requirements when further details on equivalences are published
The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project (EP) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. The Extended Project is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result the University will not include it in the conditions of any offer made to you. However, if you choose to undertake the EP we would strongly encourage you to draw upon these experiences within your personal statement, as it may be taken into account when your application is considered.
If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines
Minimum IELTS score of 7.0 or equivalent;
eg. NCUK EAP minimum Grade of A with range of 70-79
     TOEFL: IBT score of 100.

For further details see the University guidance
on English Language.
Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.
Application and selection
Apply through UCAS
Applications are considered on the bachelorsis of an assessment of the quality of the personal statement, the reference, and past and predicted academic achievements. We encourage applicants to give details of their motivation for studying this particular subject.
Normally, we only interview applicants who are applying with non-standard entry requirements.
We warmly encourage applications from mature applicants and students returning to education. All such applications are considered on an...