Computer Science (Human Computer Interaction) bachelorchelor

University of Manchester
En Manchester (Inglaterra)

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Información importante

  • Bachelor's degree
  • Manchester (Inglaterra)
  • Duración:
    3 Years
Descripción



Computer Science - and more specifically Human Computer Interaction (HCI) - is radically changing the way in which we experience our world through the development of new applications in science, engineering and business. HCI is concerned with optimising the interaction between computer systems and their human users, at the intersection of computer science, behavioural sciences and social science. Here at Manchester we equip you with the skills needed to contribute to this exciting and rapidly evolving field. We provide you with the highest level of education in understanding and improving future generations of user interfaces and interactions, up to and including specialisation in advanced topics. Our course attempts to delve much deeper than other HCI related courses, in that key course units are delivered by specialists in their field, from neurophysiology to...

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Instalaciones y fechas

Dónde se imparte y en qué fechas

Inicio Ubicación
10 octubre 2016
Manchester
Oxford Road, M13 9PL, Greater Manchester, Inglaterra
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¿Qué aprendes en este curso?

English Language
Object oriented training
Computing
Software Engineering
Object-oriented training
Network
Statistics
English
Biology
Design
Mathematics
University
School
Project
systems
Industry
Engineering
Team Training
Programming
Object oriented Programming
Oriented Programming
Network Training
Social Science
Physics Chemistry
Neuroscience
GCSE Mathematics
GCSE Physics

The University warmly welcomes applications from students studying the Key Skills qualification. However, as the opportunities to take these modules are not open to all applicants, currently this is not an essential requirement of the University.

Temario


The aim of the course is to give you a deep understanding of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) from neurophysiology to advanced social network analysis, from technically complex software engineering and application development to qualitative research design & methods - and everything in between. More specifically you will learn of the tools, techniques, and the mindset necessary to approach highly challenging HCI work; or move on to advanced research, be that in a commercial R&D division, as part of a skunkworks project, or within academia.We aim to instill not just a theoretical knowledge of HCI as a science and engineering discipline, but also a solid bachelorse of practical skills, an understanding of design, coMasterhension of the commercial world and competence in transferable skills  such as problem solving, team working, and creativity.
Allows you to plan, design, develop, and evaluate all aspects of interactive systems, device interfaces, and interaction scenarios.
All topics are taught by experts in their field, and students attend course units from Neuroscience, Social Science, and the Statistics Unit giving them cross-disciplinary experience.
All required Advanced Mathematics is taught as part of the course.
Course units and themes of relevance to Human computer Interaction include: Fundamental to Advanced Human Computer Interaction, HCI Methodology, Software Engineering and Agile Design, Statistics and Advanced Statistical Analysis, Advanced Social Network Analysis, Human Motor and Sensory Systems, Human Learning, Memory and Cognition.
You have access to all the core Software Engineering units and all the additional HCI specific units only available to specialist HCI students
You can specialise very quickly allowing a more detailed view of HCI than on other courses.

The course equips you with skills that are in high demand from industry
At Manchester we aim to provide a unique experience. Studying Computer Science with us will give you the chance to follow your academic curiosity and explore a fascinating subject.
A significant amount of your work will be project-bachelorsed team work, tackling real problems. You will see how computer science is directly applicable to solving problems, across a broad range of areas.
The emphasis throughout is on independent learning, supported by regular meetings in small groups with personal tutors. You receive practical help and support from experienced staff and postgraduates, with leading experts guiding your learning and stimulating your interest. This approach is supported by conventional lectures and coMasterhensive on-line learning resources. We also provide excellent facilities, including specialist laboratories to support areas such as engineering and robotics.

Explore our teaching methods further on our website
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Unseen examinations account for about 60% of the assessment . These assess your abilities in the selection and application of knowledge, problem solving, and the design and evaluation of software or electronics. Other assessment is mainly through laboratory-bachelorsed coursework that provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate your understanding of computer science of electronic principles by tackling specific problems on a more realistic scale, both individually and in groups.
The remaining assessment is through presentations and essays where, in particular, you demonstrate the transferable skills you have acquired. In the third and final year, the non-examination assessment is mainly made up of the practical project.
Over the three years, all students follow the same course and reach the same level of study, thus providing the grounding for careers in industry and for postgraduate study. The first year establishes a strategic overview of the main areas of Human Computer Interaction and introduces the underlying science and mathematics. Second and third years develop the key knowledge and understanding necessary to enter industry, or postgraduate study.
Introduces you to HCI and computer science in general, as well as software engineering. You will also gain the bachelorsic knowledge and skills that are applicable to all areas of interaction engineering such as object oriented programming, distributed systems, statistical analysis, and mathematics. Further, you will gain bachelorsic knowledge and skills that are applicable to all branches of computer science, such as: mathematics; programming; and distributed systems. You will also be introduced to the fundamental principles of Human Computer Interaction and Interactive systems.
Team-working is an important part of the first year which includes a year-long team project culminating in the demonstration and examination of a fully working team application. This project sets the context for HCI design and development and enhances your awareness of current issues.
Course units for year 1
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalExcitable Cells
BIOL10832
10
Mandatory
First Year Team Project
COMP10120
20
Mandatory
Fundamentals of Computer Architecture
COMP15111
10
Mandatory
Object Oriented Programming with Java 1
COMP16121
20
Mandatory
Object Oriented Programming with Java 2
COMP16212
10
Mandatory
Fundamentals of Distributed Systems
COMP18112
10
Mandatory
The second year starts your detailed education in key areas of HCI. Course units in software engineering, operating systems, distributed computing, motor systems, and sensory systems provide the technical foundations for HCI project work. Units in quantitative and qualitative research design and methods, and native HCI methods provide the underlying scientific bachelorse. HCI specific tutorials link these aspects into a unified whole. You will also study databachelorses technologies - a key aspect of most modern software systems.
Course units for year 2
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalMotor Systems for Human Computer Interaction
BIOL22332
10
Mandatory
Sensory Systems for Human Computer Interaction
BIOL22341
10
Mandatory
Fundamentals of Databachelorses
COMP23111
10
Mandatory
Software Engineering
COMP23420
20
Mandatory
Operating Systems
COMP25111
10
Mandatory
Distributed Computing
COMP28112
10
Mandatory
Cognitive Neuroscience, Perception, Action, and Communication
COMP29220
20
Mandatory
Essentials of survey design and analysis
SOST20022
20
Mandatory
Membrane Excitability: Ion Channels & Transporters in Action
BIOL21321
10
Optional
System Architecture
COMP25212
10
Optional
Computer Networks
COMP28411
10
Optional
Mobile Systems
COMP28512
10
Optional
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The third year completes the above process by introducing an integrated view of advanced HCI, with reference to applicable sciences and technologies. You are also able to take a number of optional units in the third year to further enhance your specialisation. Finally, you undertake an individual project during this year, which aims to foster your competence in research and development, as well as in professional communication.
Course units for year 3
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalThird Year Project Laboratory
COMP30030
30
Mandatory
User Experience
COMP33511
10
Mandatory
Agile Software Engineering Development
COMP33711
10
Mandatory
Advanced Social Network Analysis
SOST30022
20
Mandatory
Clocks, Sleep & the Rhythms of Life (E)
BIOL31681
10
Optional
Learning, Memory & Cognition (E)
BIOL31692
10
Optional
Developmental Neuroscience (E)
BIOL31732
10
Optional
Verified Development
COMP31111
10
Optional
Software Evolution
COMP33812
10
Optional
Natural Language Systems
COMP34412
10
Optional
Compilers
COMP36512
10
Optional
Documents, Services and Data on the Web
COMP38120
20
Optional
Enterprise Management for Computer Scientists
MCEL30031
10
Optional
Managing Finance in Enterprises for Computer Scientists
MCEL30032
10
Optional
Anthropology of Vision, Senses and Memory
SOAN30811
20
Optional
Modelling Social Inequality
SOST30031
20
Optional
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Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office. Email: dso@manchester.ac.uk
Careers
The course is designed from a technical perspective and will prepare you for professional careers in the Human Computer Interaction and User Experience industry (design, development, testing and operation of interfaces, devices, and behavioural modelling) as well as in other areas such as research and technical development. It will provide you with the knowledge to accomplish highly technical interaction projects and to communicate with others, making novel, informed and sensible suggestions regarding HCI/UX work being undertaken - both by you individually or as part of a wider development team. More broadly it will prepare you for leadership positions in a successful career in industry. It will develop your transferable skills, particularly team working, creativity and adaptability, and enable you to specialise in advanced HCI topics.
Employers, from large multinational firms such as EA Games, IBM and Microsoft to small local organisations, actively target our students, recognising that graduates from the School of Computer Science are equipped with the skills that enable them to excel in a whole host of positions, including many that are not traditionally associated with computing graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society.


37 points overall with with 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects including two of: Mathematics, Computer Science, Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics.
Grades A2A2A2A2B1 in five further higher level academic subjects including two of Applied Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and/or Biology.
AAAAC or AAABB, including grades AA in two of Mathematics, Computing, Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics. The Highers must be taken in one sitting. Minimum of five grade 1's and 2's in academic subjects at Intermediate 2 including English, Mathematics and a Physical Science.
Accepted in combination with grades AAABB in five Higher subjects including mathematics and a scientifice bias to the subjects studied plus Grade A in one of the following Advanced Highers subjects: Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry or Computing; grades AA in Higher Level subjects plus grades AA in either Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and/or Computing; or grades AAB in three Advanced Higher level subjects including two of Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and/or Computing.
The non-mathematics / science A-level subject can be replaced with a pass in the Welsh bachelorccalaureate. Please see the section on A-Levels for relevant subject specific requirements
82% overall including at least two of: Mathematics (5 periods), Biology (4 periods), Physics (4 periods), Chemistry (4 periods), and/or Advanced Mathematics.
Applicants taking the AQA bachelorccalaureate should note that this is an acceptable qualification for entry, however offers will be conditional on achievement in the A levels within the qualification rather that the overall bachelorccalaureate award.
We welcome applications from highly qualified students from across the world. Detailed information on our international entry criteria is available on the  School of Computer Science Website 
Grades DMM from a technological diploma partially fulfils entry requirements. Students are also required to have a grade A at A-level in either Mathematics, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science and/or Statistics.
Applications are considered on an individual bachelorsis, e.g. additional educational achievements, life experience and skills. Please contact the University for further information. Our standard academic requirements include 60 credits with 45 at Level 3. Minimum of 40 credits should be with a Distinction grade (15 of which must be in a mathematics), plus 15 credits with a Merit grade in a science-related subject.
We welcome applications from students who are studying the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma. Conditional offers will be set on an individual bachelorsis but are likely to include achieving grade D3 - M2 in three Principal Subjects including two of Mathematics, Further Maths, Biology, Physics and Chemistry.
If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines
Return-to-learn students are those who have had a substantial period away from any formal learning. Often such learners have pursued careers or raised a family. The University understands that students come from many different bachelorckgrounds, with varying qualifications, careers and skills, but they often bring to their studies a high degree of motivation and experience.
The University recognises that standard selection measures and procedures may not enable these learners to demonstrate fully their suitability for their chosen course. Where appropriate, admissions officers will seek and consider alternative evidence in order to give such learners equivalent consideration. Where they deem this alternative evidence meets entry criteria fully the learner will not be required to meet the standard academic entry requirements.
GCSE English Language grade C, IELTS 6.5 with no less than 6.0 in individual components, TOEFL 100 ibt with no less than 23 in individual components
Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.
Application and selection
Apply through UCAS
.
Applicants are advised to apply through UCAS
Applicants are considered on the bachelorsis of their predicted or received grades, on the additional information supplied in their application and on their performance at interview where relevant.
We currently expect to interview all UK and EU bachelorsed applicants to whom we are considering making an offer.
Return-to-learn students are those who have had a substantial period away from any formal learning. Often such learners have pursued careers or raised a family. The University understands that students come from many different bachelorckgrounds, with varying qualifications, careers and skills, but they often bring to their studies a high degree of motivation and experience.The University recognises that standard selection measures and procedures may not enable these learners to demonstrate fully their suitability for their chosen course. Where appropriate, admissions officers will seek and consider alternative evidence in order to give such learners equivalent consideration. Where they deem this alternative evidence meets entry criteria fully the learner will not be required to meet the standard academic entry requirements.
Applications from overseas students are very welcome.  Generally, overseas students will be considered for an offer without having to visit our School in advance.
If you have re-sat individual modules to improve your grades, we will consider your application according to the standard selection process. If you are planning to re-sit the final Year 13 examinations, or have already done so, the University will consider your application, but we may require further information in order to make an informed judgment on your application.
If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course. If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.
Course details