English Literature and American Studies bachelor

University of Manchester
En Manchester (Inglaterra)

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  • Bachelor's degree
  • Manchester (Inglaterra)
  • Duración:
    3 Years
Descripción



The bachelor (Hons) English Literature and American Studies is an interdisciplinary degree course which offers students the opportunity to combine study of the history, literature, film, politics and popular culture of the United States with access to the full range of English Studies (literary and theoretical) and the opportunity to engage in a broadly chronological study of English literature.



In the first year of study you will have the opportunity to apply to

study abroad for one semester in your second year (there are also a limited number of year-long spaces at the University of California). The study abroad programme requires that students achieve a strong academic average of 60% (or 2:I) in their first year. Our exchange partners include the University of California, Arizona State University, the University of Massachusetts at...

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Instalaciones y fechas

Dónde se imparte y en qué fechas

Inicio Ubicación
10 octubre 2016
Manchester
Oxford Road, M13 9PL, Greater Manchester, Inglaterra
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¿Qué aprendes en este curso?

Politics
Access
Teaching
Creative Writing
English
University
Writing
American History
American Literature
Poetry

The University warmly welcomes applications from students studying the Key Skills qualification. However, as the opportunities to take these modules are not open to all applicants, currently this is not an essential requirement of the University.

Temario


The course aims to: 
Provide students with the opportunity to engage with a significant range of relevant American literature, history, politics and film, exploiting their interdependence and distinctiveness within the discipline of American Studies
Provide students with the opportunity to pursue, in parallel with American Studies, the study of English Literature from the Medieval to the Modern period
Familiarise students with, and enable them to apply, traditional and modern theories of literary and cultural criticism
Develop in students powers of critical and analytical thinking and the ability to apply these to primary and secondary texts
Foster advanced skills in written and verbachelorl forms of expression
Produce graduates possessing the transferable skills of self-management and independence essential for employment, postgraduate study, or further training.
The University of Manchester was the home of the first Department of American Studies in the UK.  The bachelor (Hons) English Literature and American Studies is taught in the subject area of English and American Studies, which has research strengths in many areas, including Twentieth-Century Literature and Culture and African-American Studies. In the second year you can choose to go to the United States or Canada for one semester or for the whole year (see below).
You will study in direct contact with scholars who are actively engaged in cutting-edge research at the forefront of new developments and ideas. This is particularly true in the third year when specialist courses are taught by staff who are acknowledged experts in their chosen fields, enabling you to pursue a rewarding path to completing your own piece of original research.

Overseas Study:
Students may apply to spend one semester studying abroad during the second year of their degree.  Exchange partners are offered to all students at the University through the Erasmus Exchange scheme (in Europe) or via the Worldwide Exchange scheme, in the USA or Canada. For more information about the Study Abroad Programme as it relates to this course, please consult the following: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/studyabroad/
You will attend both lectures and small group seminars.
The main themes of each course are outlined in lectures and followed up in more detail in tutorials, giving you the opportunity to discuss important issues with tutors and fellow students. As you progress to the second and third years there is an increasing emphasis on small-group work in tutorials and on collective research with other students. A significant part of your study time will be spent reading, taking notes, preparing presentations and writing essays (which examine particular aspects of a subject in greater depth). 
Assessment is by marked course-work and examinations, as well as written and oral presentations. You will be expected to spend 2-3 hours per week in lectures and seminars for each module. You will also be expected to spend roughly 14 hours of independent study per week on each module that you take.
The course aims to build knowledge and skills within two disciplines so that flexibility and choice increase as that bachelorse is established. By the third year, the contents of your studies are largely a function of your own choice.
The bachelor (Hons) English Literature and American Studies has limited choice in the first year, as we want to give you a solid grounding in core topics which is the best possible bachelorsis for the free choices you will make in your second and final years. The second year offers the opportunity to spend one or two semesters studying at a university in the United States or Canada. The final year requires you to write a long essay on a topic of your choice in one of a range of areas.  This will complement the remaining five modules which can be selected from approximately 30 course units available.

Course units for year 1
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalIntroduction to American Literature to 1900
AMER10021
20
Mandatory
Introduction to American Studies
AMER10500
20
Mandatory
Reading Literature
ENGL10021
20
Mandatory
Theory and Text
ENGL10062
20
Mandatory
From Reconstruction to Reagan: American History, 1877-1988
AMER10002
20
Optional
Aspects of Contemporary America
AMER10042
20
Optional
Literature and History
ENGL10072
20
Optional
In the second year you can apply to go abroad for one semester or for the whole year, or instead you can stay in Manchester.
Students in Manchester select from a range of courses offered in American History, culture, literature, film and politics.
Our exchange partners include the University of California, Arizona State University, the University of Massachusetts and the University of Toronto. Further information about our North American partner universities can be found here:

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/expanding-study/study-abroad/destinations/worldwide-partners

There are four possible pathways that students can follow:
Study at the University of Manchester for the whole year
Study at the University of California for the whole year (places are limited)
Study in Manchester for the first semester, then apply to spend the second semester in the United States or Canada (at a range of selected US and Canadian universities).
Study in Manchester for the first semester, then spend the second semester in Europe (Exchange partners are offered to all students at the University through the Erasmus Exchange scheme (in Europe).
Course units for year 2
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalFrom Jamestown to James Brown: African-American History and Culture
AMER20141
20
Mandatory
American Literature and Social Criticism, 1900-Present
AMER20481
20
Mandatory
American Film Studies
AMER20072
20
Optional
Work and Play in the USA, 1880-2010
AMER20111
20
Optional
Southern Crossings: Race, Gender and Sexuality
AMER20412
20
Optional
Twentieth Century African American Literature
AMER20492
20
Optional
The American Melting Pot: Immigration and Ethnicity from Coast to Coast
AMER20811
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Fiction
ENGL20002
20
Optional
Chaucer: Texts, Contexts, Conflicts
ENGL20232
20
Optional
Shakespeare
ENGL20372
20
Optional
Gender, Sexuality and the Body: Theories and Histories
ENGL20482
20
Optional
Writing, Identity and Nation
ENGL20491
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL20901
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL20902
20
Optional
Renaissance Literature
ENGL21151
20
Optional
Old English: Writing the Unreadable Past
ENGL21161
20
Optional
Satire and the Novel: English Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century
ENGL21182
20
Optional
Modernism
ENGL21192
20
Optional
Romanticism (1776-1832)
ENGL21521
20
Optional
Victorian Manchester: Culture and Economy
ENGL21621
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 20 course units for year 2
Display all course units for year 2

Course units for year 3
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalLong Essay
AMER30002
20
Optional
American Slavery: Society and Culture in the Slave South
AMER30021
20
Optional
Hip Hop and Hollywood
AMER30052
20
Optional
Love American Style
AMER30162
20
Optional
Occupy Everything
AMER30422
20
Optional
Harlem and the State of Urbachelorn America
AMER30511
20
Optional
The Visual Culture of US Empire
AMER30521
20
Optional
Staging America: Race, Identity and Exhibition
AMER30562
20
Optional
Cities of Dreadful Delight: Gender, Race and Sexuality in the Americas 1800-Present
AMER30771
20
Optional
American Crime Fiction: Genre, Commerce, Ideology
AMER30782
20
Optional
Beat Writing
AMER30791
20
Optional
Long Essay
ENGL30002
20
Optional
Gothic: Politics, Sexuality and Identity in Early Gothic Writing
ENGL30072
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Fiction
ENGL30122
20
Optional
Culture and Conflict: Neoliberalism and Cultural Production
ENGL30261
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL30901
20
Optional
The Great War: Culture, History, Theory
ENGL30931
20
Optional
Contemporary Post-Colonial Fiction and Film
ENGL30972
20
Optional
Kipling, Forster and India
ENGL31111
20
Optional
Eros: Love Poetry in the Nineteenth Century
ENGL31202
20
Optional
Transnational Shakespeare: Texts, Places, Identities
ENGL31212
20
Optional
Crossing Over with Tilda Swinton: Feminist and Queer Readings of Cinema, Politics and Culture
ENGL31242
20
Optional
LOL: The Serious Business of Comedy in Fiction, Theatre, and Film
ENGL31252
20
Optional
Sex, Nation and Dissent: The Irish Novel since James Joyce
ENGL31331
20
Optional
Things that Talk: Nonhuman Voices in Anglo-Saxon Literature and Culture
ENGL31622
20
Optional
Revenge Tragedy: Wild Justice on the English Renaissance Stage
ENGL31761
20
Optional
Creative Writing Screenwriting
ENGL31951
20
Optional
What is Modernism?
ENGL31961
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Video Games and Interactive Media
ENGL31972
20
Optional
Lord Byron
ENGL33022
20
Optional
The Word: Performing, Writing, Reading the Bible, c1380-c1611
ENGL33031
20
Optional
Writing Workers/Workers Writing
ENGL33041
20
Optional
Gendered Experiments: Women's Innovative Writing in the Twentieth Century
ENGL33061
20
Optional
Ulysses
ENGL33072
20
Optional
Imagining the Body in the Long Eighteenth Century: Materiality, Mortality, and Disease
ENGL33081
20
Optional
Troy Stories
ENGL33092
20
Optional
Dante in Modernism
ENGL34001
20
Optional
Imagining the Early Modern: From Henry V to Game of Thrones
ENGL34011
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 38 course units for year 3
Display all course units for year 3
'What I enjoyed most about studying English Literature at Manchester is its ability to interact with a great breadth of diverse and wonderful subjects be they sociological, theoretical, psychological, economical or political. Not only do we analyse brilliant (and notable) literary and cultural texts, but study their contextual significance through a critical lens. The course has allowed me to ask questions about the 'normative' nature of society and the ways literature can often challenge, yet also work within, dominant structures. Whilst providing me with a wide range of knowledge, the course has also allowed me to develop my specific interest in Marxism. Consequently, we are given the freedom in essays to be intellectually creative and apply theories to texts which may never have been considered before. The importance of studying such a rich, interesting and hugely necessary degree, such as the one offered at Manchester, cannot be overstated.' - Maeve O'Sullivan.
The bachelor (Hons) English Literature and American Studies gives you three years in which to make use of the resources of one of the best libraries in Britain.  You will also learn to produce and present academic written work to a professional standard (with footnotes and bibliography), read critically, think quickly, and express your ideas in discussion.  You will gain confidence in the oral presentation of your work, and will learn how to research using traditional and modern techniques.
You will have access to a wide range of resources. Excellent library facilities are provided by the John Rylands University Library which includes among its extensive holdings renowned collections in the medieval, Victorian and American literary fields, the latter including the Walt Whitman Collection and the Upton Sinclair Collection. Holdings also include the archive material of the Manchester Poetry Centre. American history is also well-served by several major research databachelorses dedicated to topics such as the African American Experience, the nineteenth-century US press, and American religion. The English and American Studies Film Library is another substantial and growing learning resource.
As a student of the University of Manchester you will also have access to the excellent computing facilities run by Manchester Computing, which include hundreds of PCs grouped in clusters around the campus.
Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office. Email: disability@manchester.ac.uk
Careers
Graduates of the Division of English, American Studies and Creative Writing enjoy career opportunities in a wide range of professions. The question to ask is less which jobs does a degree from EAC allow me to do? than which jobs doesn't such a degree allow me to do? `Traditional' careers in publishing, journalism, the media, teaching, the civil service and librarianship are still followed.
More specifically, the bachelor (Hons) in English Literature and American Studies offers multi-disciplinary training, which equips students for a variety of job opportunities.  Employers value the transferable skills students acquire, such as skills in advanced research methods, analytical techniques and excellent verbachelorl and written communication skills. As a result, our graduates are highly employable.  Some of our graduates like to spend a year or two teaching English abroad. 

If you apply to us and receive an offer, you will be invited to one of the subject visit days.

35 points overall (core points accepted), including 7 points in English Literature at Higher level
A2A2A2B2B2 at Higher Level, to include A in EngLit (or Eng Lang and Lit)
Grades AAAAB: accepted only in conjunction with 3 Adv Hrs at stated grades.
Grades AAB to include A in English Literature (or English Lit with Lang - but not
Eng Lang only)
We welcome and recognise the value of the Advanced Welsh bachelorccalaureate and normally require two A Levels to be included within this. For applicants holding the newly reformed Advanced core (first teaching 2015), the grade required will normally be the same as the lowest A Level grade listed in the course entry requirements. We advise you to contact us if you require clarification on the acceptability of your specific portfolio of qualifications.
77-75% with a mark of at least 8 in English Lit (or Lang & Lit, but not Eng Language alone)
We welcome the AQA bachelorccalaureate - offers will be made on the bachelorsis of the A-level components.  See A-level section for subject and grade requirements.
The University of Manchester has a rich academic heritage and is one of the world's leading research-intensive universities. It also has a long history of welcoming international students and seeks to continue this tradition by admitting excellent students from across the world. Details of country specific entry requirements are available from the University website
.
BTec Diploma in a Humanities-related subject, with a minimum of 60 credits awarded at Distinction, 50 credits at Merit and 10 credits at Pass, PLUS A-level Grade A in English Literature (or Language and Literature, but not Language alone).
D1-D2
Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3. Minimum of 30 credits with a Distinction grade (15 of which must be in Eng Lit, or Eng Lang & Lit), plus 15 credits with a Merit grade in a Humanities-related subject. Applicants must have GCSE in English (at grade B or higher).  They must also EITHER have GCSE Mathematics (at Grade C or higher), OR be able to demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits in Maths at Level 2. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual bachelorsis.
The number of applicants that are studying towards the Access to Higher Education course are is increasing each year for this degree programme. We have therefore put in place a selection process whereby applications are evaluated on an individual bachelorsis and are processed in four stages.
1. The UCAS application including the whole educational profile, references and personal statement are evaluated for potential suitability for the degree programme.
2. In March up to date academic references are sought and successful candidates will also be asked to submit no more than two A4 sides of a handwritten assignment on a piece of literature they have read. This could be a piece of marked course work produced during the Access Course.
3. On receipt of up to date references and evaluation of assignment submitted, applicants will at this stage be shortlisted for interview.
4. The interview is informal and you may be asked questions on the piece of work submitted and is primarily to evaluate your suitability for the degree programme. Candidates will be informed of the outcome within a few days.
The University welcomes applicants with the AP qualification. Such applications will be considered on an individual bachelorsis.
Both the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, and Principal Subjects in combination with A levels, are accepted by the School. Please see A-level requirements for grades and subject requirements for individual courses. For admissions purposes grade D3 will be considered comparable to grade A at A level and grade M1 comparable to grade B at A level.
The Globachelorl Perspectives short course will not form part of your offer.  However, we recognise the value of this course and recommend that you draw upon this learning and experience when composing your personal statement.
The University of Manchester welcomes the introduction of the level 3 specialised diplomas. We look forward to providing guidance regarding progression opportunities and subject and grade requirements for the...