English Literature with Creative Writing bachelor

University of Manchester
En Manchester (Inglaterra)

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  • Bachelor's degree
  • Manchester (Inglaterra)
  • Duración:
    3 Years
Descripción



This is a small, specialised creative writing pathway within an English Literature degree. Students will take 25% of their credits in creative writing (both fiction and poetry).

The course covers the full range of English literature from Old English to the present day. The creative writing component of the course focuses on fiction and poetry writing.  The course will introduce you to techniques of fiction and poetry writing and develop your understanding of i) the craft of writing ii)  the nature and necessity of revision and iii) the importance of being able to give and receive constructive feedbachelorck.

The creative writing component of the degree will be taught in small group workshops. Students will write their own poems and stories regularly, read relevant work from established writers, and respond to examples of contemporary...

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Instalaciones y fechas

Dónde se imparte y en qué fechas

Inicio Ubicación
10 octubre 2016
Manchester
Oxford Road, M13 9PL, Greater Manchester, Inglaterra
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¿Qué aprendes en este curso?

English Language
Access
Creative Writing
English
Appreciation
University
Project
Writing
Media
Humanities
Poems
Poetry
Shakespeare

The University warmly welcomes applications from students studying the Key Skills qualification. However, as the opportunities to take these modules are not open to all applicants, currently this is not an essential requirement of the University.

Temario


The course aims to
encourage engagement with a significant range of literary/non-literary genres, incl. film, music, texts in the English language from British Isles/US/other English-speaking communities, from Anglo-Saxon times to the present;
provide an opportunity to study/specialise in literature, theory, film, popular song, and/or new media;
enable the study of texts in historical/cultural contexts, develop an appreciation of the specific contexts that condition the representation of allegedly 'universal' concepts and an appreciation of how our own historical/cultural location affects our understanding of literature;
familiarise students with and enable them to apply traditional and modern theories of literary/cultural criticism;
develop students' powers of critical/analytical thinking alongside an appreciation of the crafting of written utterances and the interrelationships between texts, together with an ability to apply such techniques to sophisticated primary/secondary texts;
encourage students to respond imaginatively, intellectually and independently to the written word; enable them to carry this quality of response into future reading experiences;
encourage enthusiasm for English and appreciation of its importance in the world today/in the future;
foster sophisticated literacy skills whilst encouraging correct and appropriate presentation/referencing; develop fluency and clarity in discussion and in oral/written presentation;
encourage continuous, developing reflection, enabling both responsibility for personal learning and the ability to make informed choices for future development;
develop skills for employment/further study, both discipline-related and transferable to other contexts;
sustain/enhance a body of knowledge about, and critical appreciation of, literature and other cultural forms, in preparation for postgraduate study/professional careers.
Students on the English Literature with Creative Writing pathway are given free admission to 'Literature Live' - a series of readings and discussions featuring high profile poets and fiction writers which runs regularly throughout the academic year. They are also able to attend selected workshops and discussions with visiting writers. The famous John Rylands Library, Deansgate is also part of the University and offers the rare opportunity to see a Gutenberg bible, Shakespeare folios and other archival treasures.

Students may apply to spend one semester studying abroad during the second year of their degree. Exchange partners are offered in Europe, through the Erasmus Exchange scheme, or via the Worldwide Exchange scheme, in either the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong or Singapore. For more information about the Study Abroad Programme please consult the following: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/studyabroad/
The creative writing component of the degree is taught in small group workshops. In workshops students will read and comment on each other's work under the guidance of tutors. Students will be expected to write their own poems and stories regularly and to read relevant work from established writers.
On the critical side, during your first and second years you will be taught mainly by lecture and tutor-led sessions. Tutorials give you the opportunity to consider the same texts and topics as the lectures but with a different approach. Tutorial groups usually meet at least once a week, and numbers are kept as low as possible so that you get to know one another and share your ideas. Other course units (mainly those in your final year) are taught by a weekly seminar taken by a specialist member of staff. A compulsory third-year long essay gives you experience in independent research and allows you to develop a personal project. For some course units you join in group work and other forms of collaborative learning. You will also use web-bachelorsed and other computerised resources to support your learning.
The programme employs a variety of forms of assessment and includes unseen and revealed written examinations, course work essays, research reports, practical tests, learning logs, web contributions, a long essay and oral presentations.
Course units for year 1
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalReading Literature
ENGL10021
20
Mandatory
Mapping the Medieval
ENGL10051
20
Mandatory
Theory and Text
ENGL10062
20
Mandatory
Literature and History
ENGL10072
20
Mandatory
English Literature Tutorials
ENGL10170
20
Mandatory
Creative Writing
ENGL11742
20
Mandatory
Course units for year 2
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalCreative Writing: Fiction
ENGL20002
20
Mandatory
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL20901
20
Mandatory
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL20902
20
Mandatory
American Film Studies
AMER20072
20
Optional
From Jamestown to James Brown: African-American History and Culture
AMER20141
20
Optional
American Literature and Social Criticism, 1900-Present
AMER20481
20
Optional
Twentieth Century African American Literature
AMER20492
20
Optional
Chaucer: Texts, Contexts, Conflicts
ENGL20232
20
Optional
Shakespeare
ENGL20372
20
Optional
Gender, Sexuality and the Body: Theories and Histories
ENGL20482
20
Optional
Writing, Identity and Nation
ENGL20491
20
Optional
Renaissance Literature
ENGL21151
20
Optional
Old English: Writing the Unreadable Past
ENGL21161
20
Optional
Satire and the Novel: English Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century
ENGL21182
20
Optional
Modernism
ENGL21192
20
Optional
Romanticism (1776-1832)
ENGL21521
20
Optional
Victorian Manchester: Culture and Economy
ENGL21621
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 17 course units for year 2
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Course units for year 3
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalLong Essay
ENGL30002
20
Mandatory
Love American Style
AMER30162
20
Optional
Occupy Everything
AMER30422
20
Optional
American Crime Fiction: Genre, Commerce, Ideology
AMER30782
20
Optional
Beat Writing
AMER30791
20
Optional
Gothic: Politics, Sexuality and Identity in Early Gothic Writing
ENGL30072
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Fiction
ENGL30122
20
Optional
Culture and Conflict: Neoliberalism and Cultural Production
ENGL30261
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL30901
20
Optional
The Great War: Culture, History, Theory
ENGL30931
20
Optional
Contemporary Post-Colonial Fiction and Film
ENGL30972
20
Optional
Kipling, Forster and India
ENGL31111
20
Optional
Eros: Love Poetry in the Nineteenth Century
ENGL31202
20
Optional
Transnational Shakespeare: Texts, Places, Identities
ENGL31212
20
Optional
Crossing Over with Tilda Swinton: Feminist and Queer Readings of Cinema, Politics and Culture
ENGL31242
20
Optional
LOL: The Serious Business of Comedy in Fiction, Theatre, and Film
ENGL31252
20
Optional
Things that Talk: Nonhuman Voices in Anglo-Saxon Literature and Culture
ENGL31622
20
Optional
Revenge Tragedy: Wild Justice on the English Renaissance Stage
ENGL31761
20
Optional
Creative Writing Screenwriting
ENGL31951
20
Optional
What is Modernism?
ENGL31961
20
Optional
Creative Writing: Video Games and Interactive Media
ENGL31972
20
Optional
Lord Byron
ENGL33022
20
Optional
The Word: Performing, Writing, Reading the Bible, c1380-c1611
ENGL33031
20
Optional
Writing Workers/Workers Writing
ENGL33041
20
Optional
Gendered Experiments: Women's Innovative Writing in the Twentieth Century
ENGL33061
20
Optional
Ulysses
ENGL33072
20
Optional
Imagining the Body in the Long Eighteenth Century: Materiality, Mortality, and Disease
ENGL33081
20
Optional
Troy Stories
ENGL33092
20
Optional
Dante in Modernism
ENGL34001
20
Optional
Imagining the Early Modern: From Henry V to Game of Thrones
ENGL34011
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 30 course units for year 3
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'What I enjoyed most about studying English Literature at Manchester is its ability to interact with a great breadth of diverse and wonderful subjects be they sociological, theoretical, psychological, economical or political. Not only do we analyse brilliant (and notable) literary and cultural texts, but study their contextual significance through a critical lens. The course has allowed me to ask questions about the 'normative' nature of society and the ways literature can often challenge, yet also work within, dominant structures. Whilst providing me with a wide range of knowledge, the course has also allowed me to develop my specific interest in Marxism. Consequently, we are given the freedom in essays to be intellectually creative and apply theories to texts which may never have been considered before. The importance of studying such a rich, interesting and hugely necessary degree, such as the one offered at Manchester, cannot be overstated.' - Maeve O'Sullivan.
Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk
Careers
Graduates of English, American Studies and Creative Writing enjoy career opportunities in a wide range of professions. The question to ask is less 'Which jobs does a degree in English and American Studies allow me to do'? than 'Which jobs doesn't such a degree allow me to do'?
More traditional careers in publishing, journalism, the media, teaching, the civil service and librarianship are still followed. But our surveys of recent graduates have revealed that our students also pursue an impressive variety of careers in such fields as law, bachelornking, fashion, advertising, accountancy, business management, commerce, the new media, computing and archive studies. Studying English, American Studies and Creative Writing helps to develop versatile skills that include the ability to manage one's time effectively, to communicate ideas clearly in spoken and written forms, to articulate a knowledge of concepts and theories, and to work and to think independently, critically and creatively.


37-35 points overall (core points accepted), including 7 points in English Literature at Higher level, plus 6 or 7 in two further Higher Level subjects.
A2A2A2A2B1-A2A2A2B2B2 at Higher Level: to include A in EngLit (or Eng Lang and Lit but not EngLang alone)
Grades AAAAA-AAAAB, taken at one sitting, including English at grade A: accepted only in conjunction with 3 Advanced Highers at Grades shown.
Grades AAA-AAB including either grade A in English Literature (or Lang and Lit, bot not Eng Lang only)
We welcome and recognise the value of the Advanced Welsh bachelorccalaureate and normally require two A Levels to be included within this. For applicants holding the newly reformed Advanced core (first teaching 2015), the grade required will normally be the same as the lowest A Level grade listed in the course entry requirements. We advise you to contact us if you require clarification on the acceptability of your specific portfolio of qualifications.
80-77% with a mark of at least 8 in English Lit (or Lang & Lit, but not Eng Language alone)
We welcome the AQA bachelorccalaureate - offers will be made on the bachelorsis of the A-level components.  See A-level section for subject and grade requirements.
The University of Manchester has a rich academic heritage and is one of the world's leading research-intensive universities. It also has a long history of welcoming international students and seeks to continue this tradition by admitting excellent students from across the world. Details of country specific entry requirements are available from the University website
.
BTEC Diploma in a Humanities-related subject, with a minimum of 100 credits awarded at Distinction and the remaining 20 credits at Merit, plus A-level Grade A in English Literature (or English Language and Literature).
Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3. Minimum of 30 credits with a Distinction grade (15 of which must be in Eng Lit, or Eng Lang & Lit), plus 15 credits with a Merit grade in a Humanities-related subject. Applicants must have GCSE in English (at grade B or higher).  They must also EITHER have GCSE Mathematics (at Grade C or higher), OR be able to demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits in Maths at Level 2. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual bachelorsis.
The number of applicants that are studying towards the Access to Higher Education course are increasing each year for this degree programme. we have therefore put in place a selection process whereby applications are evaluated on an individual bachelorsis and are processed in four stages.
1. The UCAS application including the whole educational profile, references and personal statement are evaluated for potential suitability for the degree programme.
2. In March up to date academic references are sought and successful candidates will also be asked to submit no more than two A4 sides of a handwritten assignment on a piece of literature they have read. This could be a piece of marked course work produced during the Access Course.
3. On receipt of up to date references and evaluation of assignment submitted, applicants will at this stage be shortlisted for interview.
4. The interview is informal and you may be asked questions on the piece of work submitted and is primarily to evaluate your suitability for the degree programme. Candidates will be informed of the outcome within a few days.
The University welcomes applicants with the AP qualification. Such applications will be considered on an individual bachelorsis.
Both the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, and Principal Subjects in combination with A levels, are accepted by the School. Please see A-level requirements for grades and subject requirements for individual courses. For admissions purposes grade D3 will be considered comparable to grade A at A level and grade M1 comparable to grade B at A level.
The Globachelorl Perspectives short course will not form part of your offer.  However, we recognise the value of this course and recommend that you draw upon this learning and experience when composing your personal statement.
The University of Manchester welcomes the introduction of the level 3 specialised diplomas. We look forward to providing guidance regarding progression opportunities and subject and grade requirements for the English Literature degree when further details on the Humanities
 Line of Learning is published.
The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project (EP) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. The Extended Project is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result the University will not include it in the conditions of any offer made to you. However, if you choose to undertake the EP we would strongly encourage you to draw upon these experiences within your personal statement, as it may be taken into account when your application is considered.
If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines
Minimum IELTS score of 7.0 or equivalent;
eg. NCUK EAP minimum Grade of A with range of 70-79
     TOEFL: IBT score of 100.

For further details see the University guidance
on English Language.
Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.
Application and selection
Apply through UCAS
English Literature courses are very competitive Subject Area here at the University of Manchester: English Literature with Creative Writing receives approximately 150 applications for 15 places
The process runs as follows: stage 1 checks predicted/achieved grades. If suitable, applicants proceed to stage 2: online assessment. This helps us to identify the students best suited to the demands of our degree.
You will supply fairly short answers to a series of questions designed to determine aptitude and the extent to which there is a match between your interests/our ethos. You will be asked why you want to study at Manchester and give evidence of your interest in, and commitment to, the subject. You will select a short literary extract (from a list provided) and tell us what interests you about it. We allow 5 days for completion of the assessment, so that you can think carefully about your responses. The exercise is assessed by academic members of staff (all actively involved in our admissions process); decisions are bachelorsed on your responses, your UCAS personal statement and reference.

How it works: an e-mail will direct you to a webpage, where you will complete the assessment and submit it electronically within 5 days. Once the software has been accessed, it can only be re-accessed on the same computer;
attempts to access it on a different computer will time out before the 5 days have expired. You must monitor your e-mail account (inc. spam folder) for e-mails regarding the process. A further e-mail will be sent from the system immediately after submission of the assessment, acknowledging receipt and providing you with a copy of...